Pruning & Drying Herbs

Do you know how to prune and dry your herbs?  Preserving is the best way to get the most out of your herb garden.

Pruning Herbs

As you’re harvesting herbs such as basil, rosemary, and mint, snip off any flowers that form. This will encourage the creation of a bushier plant with more leaves that have better flavor.

Drying Herbs

Dry herbs such as basil, parsley, and sage to store through winter by cutting 6 -to 12-inch long stems, remove any dead or diseased leaves, and hang stems upside down in paper bags in a shaded, airy, cool location.

Free Samples – Easy to Boot!

I have just got to tell you how excited I was to find a website that actually is a great sampling website. Mysavings.com offers samples, coupons, coupons codes, etc. You don’t have to jump through hoops by saying no to 100 offers. You simply click on the sample you want and fill in the form…that is it!!! I have an autofill program, so it goes extremely fast for me.

They have tons of samples to choose from and lots of coupons besides. They are nice size samples as well. I received a Nature Made sample of Super B-Complex, in which they sent 14 softgels. I expected to receive two or three.

I love to save money and enjoy passing on things like this to everyone I know and meet. So, go save yourself some loot…they allow anyone to link to them…so here it is:

http://www.MySavings.com/

“MySavings is an online community dedicated to bringing together consumers to share money saving tips and offers.

They provide a comprehensive directory of brand name free samples, printable grocery coupons, online coupons, free stuff and freebies, and other discounts and deals so that consumers can save money on products they already buy and sample and discuss which products are right for them and their family.”

Blossom End Rot – What Causes It?

I received an email the other day from one of my subscribers and he said, “I’ve read that blossom end rot is caused by calcium deficiency and/or inconsistent watering, however I also believe I read that it can also be caused by improper or insufficient pollination. Am I right or was the pollination in reference to something else to do with tomatoes?”

I answered: There are several factors which can lead to blossom end rot: insufficient available calcium in the soil, rapid early season growth followed by extended dry period, excessive rain which smothers root hairs, excessive soil salts which “lock up” calcium uptake (usually caused by a fertilizer which is too high in nitrogen or is applied too often and nitrogen builds up), and, cultivating too close to the plant which kills rootlets. There are different types of “rots”, some are caused by lack of pollination so you didn’t just imagine that. Keep blossom end rot at bay by providing uniform soil moisture, avoid high nitrogen fertilizers (and, follow application rates carefully no matter what you use), plant in well drained soil, and, when cultivating within 1′ of the plant, do not cultivate deeper than 1″.

If you have a problem now, you might want to buy a product that deals with blossom end rot. In the Midwest, we have had 10 times more rain this summer than normal, which is what caused this in my area.

For more great tips and information, Subscribe to my Blog.

Promoting Longer Bloom Period

Do you know how to promote a longer bloom period? If you have a flower garden that includes black-eyed Susans, bachelor’s buttons, and tall phlox, do you know how to treat them to promote long-term bloomng? Does trimming the plant help, and how soon and how severely can I trim after the blooms fade?

Annual bachelor’s buttons will rebloom freely if trimmed back to remove the spent flowers. Cut the flowers as for a bouquet, just above a branch or leaf so as not to leave bare wiry stems sticking up. Black-eyed Susans will bloom naturally over a long period, but if you deadhead the plants by cutting them back by about half once the main flush begins to fade, you may stimulate another (smaller) flush of bloom in the fall.

Some gardeners simply allow the seedheads to remain and consider them an attractive fall and winter feature in and of themselves, and the birds will enjoy the seeds. The plants would then be trimmed back very short in the spring.

Tall phlox will bloom over a longer period if spent flowers are removed one by one. In general, phlox (except creeping phlox) should be trimmed off very short in the fall once frost has browned the tops. All of these plants will give their best display in full sun with rich soil that is kept evenly moist (but not soggy).

And now I would like to offer you free access to my gardening journal when you subscribe to my blog, a 16 page journal that you can use season after season. Click on Subscribe to My Blog.

Happy Gardening from the Master Gardener Girl!!

Tip: Keep Picking Those Vegetables

Do you know exactly when to pick some of the more popular vegetables? Pick vegetables to keep them producing. Pick green beans when pods are 3 to 4 inches long, but still smooth and smaller around than your little finger. Pick zucchini when it’s less than 5 inches long. Tomatoes are best when left to ripen on the vine, they lose flavor when picked to soon. Cucumbers are meant to be picked before they start turning white on the bottom, remaining all green. Pumpkin last several months when picked after the stem is brown and the pumpkin is mostly orange. If corn cobs feel full through to the top and the silk are dark brown, then grab an ear and snap downwards.

Don’t forget to subscribe to my blog by clicking on “Subscribe to Master Gardener Girls’ Gardening Blog by Email” . I will keep you up to date with my blogs and occasionally will give you free items like my Free Gardening Journal that you get when you subscribe.

Happy Gardening from the Master Gardener Girl!!

4 Ways to Preserve Sweet Corn – For Eating or Planting

Do you know the ways to preserve corn? Every ear of corn is used in some form or fashion whether for eating or for planting. All the husk and hair goes into compost pile as do the stalks. I say waste not, want not.

Keep newly picked sweet corn fresh by keeping ears cool. Picking early in the morning is the best, but I still pick at night as well. Husk and place the ears in an ice bath, adding 2 drops of liquid bleach per gallon of water, cooling ears to 37F.

The two best ways to preserve corn long term are to freeze or can the corn. In canning corn, simply shuck the corn and shave off the cob with a flat bottom of the cob on the table while running a knife down the cob. Then, follow canning instructions on cooking the corn and then processing in jars.

To freeze corn, you could simply place your corn in freezer bags but they will get a little mushy unless you blanch them first. And yes, I know that from first hand experience. Blanch them in hot boiling water for a few minutes, then cool them off in a cold water bath. After cooling, then cut to desired lengths or leave whole and place them in freezer bags.

If you have grown heirloom corn and some of the cobs really aren’t worth saving or if they have already started the drying process, let them continue drying until separated rows form. After the cobs have dried, give them the indian rub and the kernels will fall off. Put the kernels in a brown paper sack or some type of paper envelope. Label and store in a cool dry place until next season.

I save a ton of money by seed saving my corn. Those of you who plant corn know just exactly how much corn costs. On average, each cob gives about 300 kernels. If you have a small garden, you might only need one cob. I on the other hand need about 20 ears as my corn is planted in 15 rows, 300 feet long.

Check out Organic Home and Gardening, there is a propagation and seed saving eBook that can teach you how to save a great deal of money by not having to buy seeds or plants.

Happy Gardening!! Subscribe to my blog and I will keep you informed with all the good stuff.

Seed Saving – How to Collect and Store Garden Seeds?

Do you want to save money by not having to buy vegetable seeds year after year? Collecting seeds from your garden and storing them for the next season is one of the most cost savings methods of gardening. The seed collection method varies with the plant variety.

Collecting and Storing Seeds of Annual Garden Plants
Plants like snapdragon, cosmos, cleome, petunia and amaranth are the best examples for collecting seeds. But you need to be careful as their seeds drop. Given below is the systematic procedure for collecting and storing seeds of annual plants.

Once you observe the seed pod, allow them to turn brown and die and then remove them from the plant. Place the pods on a tray with newspaper or wax paper. Wax paper is generally used to find those small seeds once they are evicted from the pods. Allow the pods to dry completely in cool place. After the pods have dried completely, gently shake them on to the paper causing the seeds to be released from the pod. Remove all the foliage and husk. Collect all the seeds and store them in an envelope. Do not store them in anything plastic as plastic will make them sweat and germinate preemptively. Be sure to label and date the seed envelops for the season you will be using them for and keep them in a cool dry place for next season.

Collecting and Storing Seeds from Perennial Garden Plants
Collecting seeds from perennial garden plants is easy. You can collect seeds from pods or from their fruits. Seeds of perennials in pods are ready to collect only when the pod bursts open. There are chances that the seed might drop and germinate. Hence you need to pick the pods before they open and allow them to dry. But make sure that pick mature pods as early picking will result in immature seeds.

You can even collect seeds from the fruit trees by simply taking seeds from the ripe fruit and allowing them to dry. After the seeds have dried completely, they are ready for storing or germinating for the next season. Don’t collect seeds from the fruits you bought as they won’t produce the same kind of fruit as most of them are grafted. Just like with any seed, you can store your dried seeds in a paper envelope, with a label and date, and putting them in a dry place for the next season.

Generally the shelf life of seeds is for a few seasons and is better to germinate your hand picked seeds in the following season. For best results, seed save every year and discard leftovers from the previous year as germination rates start to decline after the first year.

For more great information on seed saving and propagation, go to Organic Home and Garden.

Remember to “Subscribe to Master Gardener Girls’ Gardening Blog by Email”. I will keep you up to date with my blogs that will include great tips and information. I will also occasionally offer you free items like my Free Gardening Journal that you will receive when you subscribe.

Happy Gardening from the Master Gardener Girl!!

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